What is medical marijuana?

The term medical marijuana refers to using the whole, unprocessed marijuana plant or its basic extracts to treat symptoms of illness and other conditions. The marijuana plant contains more than 100 different chemicals called cannabinoids. Each one has a different effect on the body. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the main chemicals used in medicine. THC also produces the "high" people feel when they smoke marijuana or eat foods containing it.

What is medical marijuana used for?

Medical marijuana is used to treat a number of different conditions, including: Alzheimer's disease Appetite loss Cancer Crohn's disease Eating disorders such as anorexia Epilepsy Glaucoma Mental health conditions like schizophrenia and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Multiple sclerosis Muscle spasms Nausea Pain Wasting syndrome (cachexia)

How does it help?

Cannabinoids -- the active chemicals in medical marijuana -- are similar to chemicals the body makes that are involved in appetite, memory, movement, and pain. Research suggests cannabinoids might: Reduce anxiety Reduce inflammation and relieve pain Control nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy Kill cancer cells and slow tumor growth Relax tight muscles in people with MS Stimulate appetite and improve weight gain in people with cancer and AIDS

Dec 21
What is medical marijuana?

Though marijuana, or cannabis, is commonly known as a recreational drug, it has been…

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